Start Predating checks

Predating checks

Check recipients can either decide to accept or not accept a post-dated check.

Often, bank tellers don't even look at the date while handling checks.

While it's best to avoid postdating checks so you don't run the risk of getting hit with bounced check fees, you can contact the bank with a written or verbal request to hold the check until the future date.

State and federal laws cover the cashing and depositing of postdated checks, and laws vary from state to state.

It's not illegal to postdate a check, unless you're attempting to commit fraud.

Curious as to what happens when I defy the concept of post-dating, I checked with banks to their rules on the matter. However, I do expect to have those funds by the date written on the check.

When you post-date a check, you put a future date on the check with the idea that the recipient does not deposit it until that written date. So, I post-date the check so that the check recipient knows not to deposit that check until that date.

With an oral notice, your request is good for only 14 days.

Your request should include the recipient's name, your account and check numbers, and the check's amount.

If you wanted to avoid it, you should stress it to the person that receives the check, or just give the check to them when you actually have the money in your account.” Upon further investigation, I found a clause in the Wells Fargo consumer account agreement (page 23) that states: So, Wells Fargo may actually try to process the check, regardless of the date that is written on the check.

Essentially, I don’t see any point in post-dating a check — it is valid from the moment that I sign it.

If he does cash it early, he can be made to pay fees and costs as well as potential civil penalties.